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20121126
20121126
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an alternative minimum tax he had been talking about for the really wealthy. >> 30% or something. >> anybody from 1 to $10 million. also talked a little bit about raising the -- >> same thing he's been saying all along. >> he added that when it comes to who should be paying the higher taxes, he wants the threshold to be $500,000. >> and you see steven rattner on on talking about capital gains, deductions and things you've talked about a lot. >> time for the global markets report. ross westgate totally still confuse aed about thanksgiving and pilgrims. what was all the hoopla about? you celebrate boxing or something, don't you? like we lost a great boxer. is that what you celebrate? what is boxing day? >> boxing day, the day of a christmas. >> you wrap all your presents in boxes? >> i think it's something to do with all the presents. i'm not quite sure. >> yeah, put them in boxes. >> maybe. >> so you ignored our thanksgiving. but feeling okay again? >> yeah. you know, it's okay. it's all right. it's gone. now we can concentrate on the run up to christmas. and how much shopping we have to do. >> a
look at the relative yield, not only is there a tax advantage you're picking up significant yield. >> michael, what would you buy here? >> how about this, gold? let's bias sets where people will be nervous and flee to assets that give them some sense of comfort. i think gold will be a $2,000 an ounce trade sometime in the next 12 months. again, i also agree you need to buy -- you should not buy treasury. i think treasuries are a bubble waiting to burst. i like municipal bond trade. i like intermediate to short term average quality corporate bonds where you're not really paying so much for the high corporate quality rate. i think you can get better yields. as russ mentioned, absolutely, investors are going to have to have some money in fixed income. you can't set in cash at zero percent, it will kill you from an inflation point. >> i've been at cnbc since 1998. sing the piece of advice given over and over is whatever you do, don't buy the long end of the treasury curve because it's a bad investment. and yet it has been the greatest investment. at some point that's going to change,
repeated their openness to being willing to raise taxes, which is something that is violated republican orthodoxy. here is jay carney just a few minutes ago in reaction to those comments. >> some of the comments you mentioned are welcome. and they represent what we hope is a difference in tone and approach to these problems and a recognition that a balanced approach to deficit reduction is the right approach. it's the one most beneficial for our economy. >> reporter: the president's trying to take advantage of that different tone. he talked to speaker boehner over the weekend by telephone. and today you've had two business leaders, john engler, tom donahue, in to meet with senior white house officials. they're trying to keep this going. aides on capitol hill tell me no substantive progress in negotiations just yet. they're just now getting back to work after thanksgiving. >> how does that make you feel about the market? does it make you feel like they have more kum-bi-ya going on in washington, d.c.? does it make you more willing to invest? >> i'll tell you what. i saw spielberg's "linc
grover norquist, condemning his pledge never to raise taxes. >> when you're $16 trillion in debt, the only pledge we should be making to each other is to avoid becoming greece and republicans should put revenue on the table. >> how's that for a profiling courage? senator graham is standing up to a pledge he made to an unelected official in charge of a group that most americans never heard of. a pledge that's 26 years old. but at least graham is voting to raise taxes on the wealthy. right? wrong. >> raises tax rates will hurt job creation so i agree with grover we should not raise rates. i will violate for the good of the country only if democrats will do entitlement reform. >> so he won't raise tax rates and entitlements need to be gutted. but that's more like it. let's see some more brave talk from the gop. >> i'm not obligated on the pledge. there's a menu of options on the revenue side and on the entitlement side and as long as there are two parties that are willing to solve this problem, this is a very easy thing to do technically. what it takes is political courage. >> guess
to leave the agency. with the content congressional negotiations are the sequester and tax cuts to expire at the end of the year, tonight and prime time, focusing on the beginnings of the debt of the debate on the national debt. c-span will go back to august of last year to review some of the debate and is congress is from congress and the white house to run in the passage of the budget control act. the law created the automatic spending cuts to take effect in january along with some expiring tax revisions as part of the so- called fiscal cliff. it airs tonight it it o'clock eastern-- a o'clock here on c-span. >> in january, our first week we were sworn into office, the president ask for an increase in the debt ceiling. i made clear at that time there would be no increase in the debt ceiling without significant cuts in spending and changes to the way we spend the american people's money. shortly after that, i was in new york and gave a speech and outlined i thought the spending cuts should exceed the amount of debt limit increase and there should be no taxes as part of this agreement. whe
what would happen if we went over the fiscal cliff. the combination of higher taxes and spending cuts are estimated to take 4% out of a relatively weak gdp. even if we do not and some deal is struck, the combination of eliminating the payroll tax reduction, which seems to be something the administration supports, that, together with some base broadening, would probably be at least 2% of gdp. if there is going to be a deal, it would involve spending cuts as well. even if we avoid going over the cliff, it looks like there will be substantial fiscal contractionary impact next year. in that environment, what can the fed do to try to offset that to make sure that it does not take us to the edge of ore over the edge of a recession? >> we will see what deal comes out. but you are correct that even if the most extreme scenarios are avoided, some plausible scenarios still involved relatively contractionary fiscal policies over all. i made that point in my remarks when i said that under most plausible scenarios, no matter what happens, the tightening of federal fiscal policy will outweigh the s
is the not reached by the end of the year, a series of tax increases and spending cuts will automatically kick in. lawmakers in both major parties say they're willing to compromise. >> when you're $16 trillion in debt, the only pledge we should be making to each other is to avoid becoming brief and republicans should put revenue on the table. >> the big questions are weather republicans are open to some forms of tax increases and whether democrats will consider cuts o to entitlement programs. >> a san francisco couple challenge of the defensive marriage act may be one of several the u.s. supreme court considers this week. the justices will decide whether to hear an appeal from the defenders of the prop 8, the initiative banning gay marriage. they're expected to meet this week to decide which cases it will hear next we're. >>> time for health watch this morning, it's 6:19, it appears childhood injuries related to inflatable bouncers are on the ride. that's according to a study published in the journal of pediatrics. bouncers and moon walks are popular at parties but it can put children at risk for
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7